Category Archives: GFR

What exactly is 100% kidney function? I was told that I had 52% in one kidney and 48% in another. Does the total of both kidneys always add up to 100% for functionality? In other words if both kidneys were functioning perfectly together each would provide 50% to get to 100%. If one kidney was having problems then one would give more than the other to always make up 100 % unless there were issues and both kidneys could not make up the 100%. For example both kidneys are giving 40% each. I wasn’t given my GRF.

When an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is measured, this give the total function for all the kidney tissue that is present, even if you have one, two or more kidneys. There are some scanning techniques (such as nuclear medicine … Continue reading

Posted in Ask the Doctor, GFR, Kidney-Related Health Questions

I am a rheumatoid arthritis/disease patient so I get labs done regularly. I read my latest blood work and my eGFR was at 72. I looked back at my prior blood work and, in the last year, I’ve consistently dropped about 20 in each blood test. A year ago I stood at 103/112 – and each subsequent blood test shows a lower eGFR. I know that, technically, it is within normal tolerance – but should I ask for a referral with such a steep drop over such a short time? I am 46 and not taking any liver-toxic meds at this time, nor do I use ibuprofen or any NSAIDs.

The equations that we use to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) are relatively inconsistent when dealing with eGFR’s above 60. Hence, these numbers can be very difficult to tell from each other and normal laboratory variation can yield very inconsistent … Continue reading

Posted in Ask the Doctor, GFR, Kidney-Related Health Questions

Are fractional excretion tests for Phosphorus, Uric Acid, Sodium, Potassium, and bicarbonate done for people who are not in suspicion of having kidney failure?

The fractional excretion tests of phosphorus, uric acid, sodium, potassium and bicarbonate are done to test the tubular functions of the kidney. This is most commonly done to diagnose a problem known as renal tubular acidosis. They can be seen … Continue reading

Posted in Ask the Doctor, GFR, Kidney Failure, Kidney-Related Health Questions

I have 1 kidney ( having lost the other to a staghorn calculi, 24 Lithotripsy, Stents and infections -it died off and was removed). My gfr has dropped from 54 in August to 36 on Tuesday. My nephrologist doesn’t seem in the least concerned. His office says he’ll see me in February as planned. Am I wrong to be concerned? I lost my right kidney in 97. Since then I have lived between 50 and 60% function in the left kidney.

Normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) for someone with a single kidney is usually within the range of 50 to 60 milliliters per minute per 1.73 meters squared. It is true, that with aging, the eGFR may decline over a … Continue reading

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Blood/Urine Testing For Kidney Disease, GFR, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Laboratory Testing, Nephrectomy / One kidney, Nephrologist

My GFR has been dropping gradually over 6yrs. I just had my kidney function checked about a wk. ago and the GFR has dropped from 55 on 9/9/17 to 54 on 11/7/17. My BUN is 22, and creatinine serum is 1.03. I am told I have stage 3 kidney failure. My Dr. tells me my kidneys are not damaged only very weak. I am waiting for referral to Nephrologist but could take month or 2. I’d rather do something ASAP and naturally, rather than wait and let my kidneys get weaker. Do you have any suggestions and can you expand some on the explanation of values? Thanks.

The equations that we use to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) cannot differentiate between a GFR of 55 or 54 milliliters per minute per 1.73 meters squared. The laboratory variation from day to day is greater than 1. Hence, … Continue reading

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Chronic Kidney Disease, GFR, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Nephrologist

My GFR has ranged between 48 to 55 hence stage 3a. In this stage, would a variation of this size be expected with normal lab variation?

Yes, this degree of variation in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) would be within the usual expected range of normal laboratory variation. The accuracy with which the laboratory measures the serum creatinine can vary by this degree.

Posted in Ask the Doctor, GFR, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Laboratory Testing, Serum Creatinine

Hello. I was just diagnosed with chronic kidney disease multifactorial. I have lupus and my PCP thinks it’s stage 3a. I’m 70 years old. Am I eligible for kidney transplant if I have a donor or am I too old? How little time does it take for the disease to progress to failure?

From your description, it sound like you have early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) with your estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) between 45 and 59 milliliters per minute per 1.73 meters squared. This stage of CKD does not require kidney … Continue reading

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Chronic Kidney Disease, GFR, Kidney-Related Health Questions

I am 44 yrs old. My doctor keeps sending me to have blood work done, but doesn’t explain the results. My latest eGFRnonAfA is 77.9 mL/min. What does this mean?

The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) for a non-African American (nonAfA) individual is greater than 60 milliliters per minute per 1.73 meters squared. The eGFR is a measure of kidney function and your would appear to be normal.

Posted in Ask the Doctor, GFR, Kidney-Related Health Questions

My creatinine level has risen up from 1.30 to 1.55 in a 5-month period and my tsh level also increased from 3 to 4.40 in this time interval. Is it possible that the increase in tsh level has a negative effect in GFR?

I do not think a mild elevation in the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level should have any effect on kidney function as measured by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or the serum creatinine.

Posted in Ask the Doctor, GFR, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Serum Creatinine

Hi. I have a proteinuria. Can you tell me about the diet which I can take in order to treat my disease. Regards.

Protein in the urine (proteinuria) does not tell me the cause of your kidney disease. Different forms of kidney disease may be treated very differently. If your kidney disease is relatively mild and your estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is … Continue reading

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Diet/Nutrition, GFR, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Proteinuria