I went to the hospital last week with elevated blood pressure, when it got to 195/120 they gave me nitro. They ran a CT of my chest and it says Incidental 4 mm Non Obstructive Left Renal Calyceal Calculus. I understand that is a kidney stone not causing any problems. Then they ran a ultrasound that revealed mild right pelvocaliectasis, the doctors said there is a blockage fluid causing swelling of my right kidney. The urinalysis showed blood, urine 2+ and RBC Urine 5-10 (norm 0 – 4). My creatitine was 1.24 and my GFR was 49. My blood ammonia level was 48 on 7/25/16. I am having massive headaches, pain in my right side and back and my blood pressure has not stabilized. I have had nausea and vomiting intermittently since I was released. I was advised by a urologist that while these are abnormal they are not abnormal enough to be concerned about. Do you think I have any reason to investigate this further or just wait for the symptoms to pass. I am going to PCP for help with the blood pressure.

The problem that you identify is a urological problem and must be evaluated and treated by a urologist.  I cannot make a specific diagnosis based on the information that you present.  Further testing may be needed by the urologist.  I suggest you discuss this with your primary care physician and see if further consultation is needed.

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Kidney Stones, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Urological Issues

I have been dealing with MSK for 30 years . My kidneys have been a ongoing issue. I have had 4 surgeries for large stone removals. This year alone I’ve had 13 lithotripsies. Prior to my lithotripsies, my kidney gfr was in the 30s. Since my lithotripsies, my kidney function has dropped to gfr 25. My urologist said my condition is too complicated and can no longer help me. I’m now in stage 4 kidney failure and I’m lost on what to do. I have constant cramps in my calves at night and frequent night urination. I’m not bloated in my legs but my stomach bloats at times because of this rare condition. Most Doctors in my area can’t help me. I’m wondering if you know of any Dr in the west coast of Florida area that’s familiar with this problem and could help me.

Neither I nor the National Kidney Foundation provide referrals.  I suggest that you contact your primary care physician (PCP) in your area and ask for a referral.  You should have further testing to determine why you are passing so many stones.  A nephrologist may be able to test you and determine the cause of repeated stone episodes and deal with your kidney disease, but removal and treatment of existing stones is best handled by a urologist.

For general information you may find helpful please click here.

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Chronic Kidney Disease, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Medullary Sponge Kidney

This year I was diagnosed twice with bacteria and now my kidneys are damaged. Creatinine and urea are high. Right now the level of creatinine is 235 and potassium is 5.4. Doctors did biopsy but it failed so I don’t know the exact diagnosis. But they told me it might be glomerulonephritis.I should avoid fruits and vegetables, meat, and salty food.

I am unable to make a specific diagnosis based on the information that you present.  A kidney biopsy is usually the best way to make a specific diagnosis but it appears to have been unhelpful in your case.  I can only suggest further consultation with a nephrologist for further testing and treatment recommendations.

For general information about chronic kidney disease please click here.

For helpful information about diet and nutrition please click here.

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diet/Nutrition, Kidney-Related Health Questions

Does a kidney have to be removed if it has a filtration rate of 17% because it has a staghorn calculus size 4 x 2.5 x 3 cm?

The question that you ask is a urological question.  I am a nephrologist and do not perform surgery.  You must consult with a urologist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Kidney Stones, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Urological Issues

I am a 72 year old female with an eGFR of 46. My creatinine, BUN, and other blood work is normal. My blood pressure averages 135/85 with no medication, and although I am overweight, I am not obese. I do not have diabetes and have never smoked. My doctor does not seem to be very concerned about it, he told me not to lose sleep over it, but to me my eGFR is too low and he has put in my medical record I am in stage 3 CKD. I am wondering if I should be as concerned as I am, or should I do like he said and not worry about it.

While you may have chronic kidney disease (CKD), there may be no other treatment that is necessary at this time.  We lose kidney function as part of the aging process at a rate of about 1%-2% each year after age 40.   I cannot make a specific diagnosis based on the information that you present and suggest that you continue to consult with your physician and monitor the progress of your CKD.  If your blood pressure is normal and you do not have any other findings or symptoms, I do not see any other treatment that would be indicated.

 

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Chronic Kidney Disease, Kidney-Related Health Questions

, I am 39 years old. I got partial nephrectomy from about 2 months for the left kidney because of a tumor of 5 x 4.3 x 3.8 cm. It was papillary type 1 grade 2, it is T1b M0N0. Is it low risk disease and how is the follow up?

The question that you ask is a urological question.  I am a nephrologist and do not deal with kidney tumors.  You should consult with a urologist to determine proper follow up of this tumor.

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Urological Issues

I would like to know what I can do if my father has chronic kidney disease and he is in need of a transplant but since he is illegal, there is no way for him to receive a transplant. What would you recommend on doing?

I can only suggest that your father visit with a social worker that is assigned to your father.  I am not sure what you mean by your father being illegal, but if he in the country illegally, then it is difficult for him to access the needed insurance coverage from Medicare that it would take for him to pay for a kidney transplant.  This is a social service problem and there may not be a solution, but I would suggest consulting with a social worker to work through the issues surrounding your father and his care.

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Insurance & Medicare Coverage, Transplantation

Is Alport’s Syndrome considered a type of kidney disease? If so, does much, or any, of the information on the National Kidney Foundation website applicable?

Alport syndrome is a genetic kidney disease.  It means that someone has been born with the genetics that make kidneys fail.  There are different types of Alport syndrome.  The information on our web site is accurate and you can access that information at:  https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/alport

Posted in Alport Syndrome, Ask the Doctor, Kidney-Related Health Questions

How long does a person have to wait on the national kidney donor list? Can someone newly diagnosed with diabetes still give a kidney?

The waiting time on a transplant list is dependent on many things including blood type, age, time on dialysis, immune testing and the location of the transplant center.  If you have diabetes, you should not be a kidney donor.  Diabetes is one of the leading causes of kidney disease, and it is important to have two kidneys if you are diabetic.

For general information you may find helpful please click here.

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Diabetes, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Living Donation

What other resources can someone use to get a kidney?

There are two sources of kidneys for transplantation.  You can get a cadaver kidney by waiting on the transplant list, once it is determined that you are an acceptable patient to be on the list.  The other source of kidneys is from living donors who donate to you.  In order to receive a kidney transplant, it must be determined that you are healthy enough to be given a kidney.  You can get further information about living kidney transplantation on our web site at:  https://www.kidney.org/transplantation/livingdonors

Posted in Ask the Doctor, Kidney-Related Health Questions, Transplantation, Treatments